5 Fantasy Movies to Tide Us Over Comments - Mania.com



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theduck1980 12/20/2012 12:04:35 AM

@ Axia777.  Game  of Thrones Season 3 you say?  Indeed!  Get behind it everyone!  Well funded fantasy TV series are rare & much better than movies if done right.  So much is missed in the time constraints of a movie...

Wiseguy 12/20/2012 4:02:53 AM

Science fiction has a definition and and  good part of Superman's abilities don't fit. So it is fantasy. That's not an opinion

Wiseguy 12/20/2012 4:09:56 AM

And to kimbroo, yeah  Indiana Jones is fantasy but like Superman it doesn't mean that there aren't also other elements.
  

The Exorcist falls under the supernatural genre, since genre is what we're talking about. But it ultimately is fantasy.
 

keithdaniel 12/20/2012 9:17:32 AM

No Wise, it would depend on your definition of "fantasy" and "science-fiction" which you have yet to give us, from your standpoint anyway, and according to the popular definition I would dare say that you're wrong.  You've said that a "good part of Superman's abilities don't fit."  You're assuming that there's no scientific explanation for his abilities but that's not true because in Superman: The Movie, Jor-EL does scientifically explain how Superman will develop his abilities before he's sent to Earth, and just because that's not a reality for us doesn't  "ultimately" mean that he and his story isn't based in science-fiction.  BTW, Wise, just a reminder, and despite his appearance Superman isn't a human but an alien!  Even if you want to classify some of his abilities as fantasy, it doesn't mean that the Superman tale isn't at the very least "science-fantasy" because there are too many aspects of that story let alone that character himself to simply relegate it to fantasy.    

You're certainly wrong about calling The Exorcist "ultimately is fantasy" it's horror and that's not just an opinion either, and for your info it's somewhat based on a true story!

Wiseguy 12/20/2012 12:01:16 PM

Science fiction has a definition, it's not my definition. Now you want to have your own personal definition then yeah I guess you can play that game.

Exorcist, yeah it's horror but it's still about supernatural. It's still fantasy at the end of the day.

And something based on a true story and it being a true story are and can be miles apart.

Kaziklu 12/23/2012 6:00:51 AM

 Wise actually Superman does fit in almost all Sci-Fi definitions. 

He's an Alien sent from Outerspace. He has special powers that are generally considered to be a genetic reaction to the Sun. (fictional science) and he is used in a modern setting with greater then modern technologies developed by various peoples. It is also a world in habited (in just the Superman mythos ignoring cross overs) multiple and various other aliens, mutants, and mad scientists. 

His stories are often designed as morality tales, or technology tales and the authors usually (or at least orginally) tried to use superman as the ideal of human morality. 

It's not High Sci-Fi and there are fantasy elements, but most comic books have that duality, which is why I personally seperate Superhero comics, from either Fantasy or Sci-fi. I personally think they are their own seperate thing with elements of both. 
 

Wiseguy 12/23/2012 6:53:04 AM

I said a lot of Superman's mythos are sci/fi but a lot of his powers are pure fantasy. Saying the sun causes it does not make it sci/fi. Science fiction  makes imaginative use of scientific knowledge or conjecture. Based on scientific knowledge and speculation, this is the basic meaning of sci/fi. Superman's powers with the exception of perhaps increased stregth have no sci/fi basis for speculation or explanation outside of "it just is"

keithdaniel 12/23/2012 7:31:03 AM

Wise, as you've said before, the generally accepted or popular definition of sci-fi isn't your definition and that's fine, to each their own as I've previously stated.  However, you're wrong to say that the Sun giving Superman his abilities doesn't make it sci-fi because in Superman: The Movie (as well as in many comic versions too I'm sure) Jor-El scientifically explains that the Earth's Sun will affect Kal-El's molecular structure giving him those abilities and allowing him to become Superman.  Again the science that's used in that movie as well as anywhere else in cinema or literature for that matter doesn't have to be proven or understood, because a part of sci-fi is that you use one's imagination and suspend disbelief!  Even if some or all of Superman's abilities are so called "fantasy" his overall story is still sci-fi.  What is sci-fi?  They're stories based on science that isn't real or not know to exist thus the word fiction.

Wiseguy 12/23/2012 1:47:45 PM

Superman is as much science fiction as werewolves who are affected by the moon or vampires by the sun.

Just because something is explained like the 3 aforementioned doesn't make it sci/fi.

Again, IT ISN'T MY DEFINITION. You are the one coming up with your own definition of sci/fi for the benefit of your point of view. I'm going by the actual definition of the term "science fiction".
There's a term "science/fntasy" that is sometimes bandied about which probably fits closer to Superman

Science fantasy will generally ignore physical laws (i.e., magic) or invent its own structure of laws which have no necessary connection to known laws. Science fiction is also more likely to take the time to delineate the laws or extensions involved, while fantasy will provide a more meager structure of its invented rules

vitieddie 12/23/2012 5:15:05 PM

Most super heroes would fit into sci-fi/fantasy ... a bit of both ...

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