D. Gray-man Vol. #11 - Mania.com



Anime/Manga

Mania Grade: D+

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Info:

  • Art Rating: B-
  • Packaging Rating: B-
  • Text/Translation Rating: B+
  • Age Rating: 16 and Up
  • Released By: Viz Media
  • MSRP: 7.99
  • Pages: 210
  • ISBN: 978-1421519982
  • Size: B6
  • Orientation: Right to Left
  • Series: D. Gray-man

D. Gray-man Vol. #11

D. Gray-man Vol. #11 Manga Review

By Ben Leary     December 10, 2009
Release Date: November 04, 2008


D. Gray-man Vol. #11
© Viz Media

Our messed-up-looking heroes struggle deeper into the Ark, exerting almost as much effort as it takes to read this volume.

Creative Staff
Writer/Artist: Katsura Hoshina
Toshifuma Yoshida
Adaptation: Lance Caselman

What They Say
Cursed teenage boy saves mankind one soul at a time. Set in a fictional 19th century England, D.Gray-man is the story of Allen Walker, a 15-year-old boy who roams the Earth in search of Innocence. Washed away to unknown parts of the world after The Great Flood, Innocence is the mysterious substance used to create weapons that obliterate demons known as akuma.
With Allen Walker once more in their ranks, the Exorcists soldier into the fabled Ark of Noah. In almost no time they encounter opposition in the form of two young Noah possessing startling powers. The Noah, however, seem less interested in the grand plans of the Millennium Earl than in collecting payment on yet another mountain of debt accrued by Allen's master, General Cross Marian. Can the Exorcists find the literal key out of this potentially lethal predicament?

Set in a fictional 19th century England, D.Gray-man is the story of Allen Walker, a 15-year-old boy who roams the Earth in search of Innocence. Washed away to unknown parts of the world after The Great Flood, Innocence is the mysterious substance used to create weapons that obliterate demons known as akuma.

The Review!
At the end of my last review I held out the hope that D.Gray-Man would have a little more story in this portion. So far it seems to have a whole lot less. It's customary to talk about hopes being dashed in situations like this, but the image isn't quite right. My hopes were more than dashed, they were...no, I'm not up to this kind of thing. I'll leave it to Mr. Hoshino's nasty imagination. You can open up just about any page of this volume, and you'll see the kind of thing it did to my hopes being done to somebody or other.

Unless, of course, you can't see it because the artist is still working under the impression that fights are more dramatic, somehow, when you can't see what's happening. Just like almost every other fight in the series, the fights here go through the same basic pattern:

a) combatants shout at each other (motivations for fighting, special attacks, trash talk, etc.)
b) big swirls of motion/energy/power blasts/hair/whatever for multiple panels.
c) combatants come to a halt as one gets the better of the other.

But not really. Fights are no longer allowed to end in D.Gray-Man and have to take up the entire volume, whether you like it or not. This is because Hoshino gets paid by the panel when he's doing action and by the chapter when he's writing story. Okay, I can't prove that. But it feels that way. Plot is just about next to zero in this book. Now that I think of it, the worst drought in the story taking place in Noah's ark has a nicely ironic twist.

Then again, if you're a fan of D.Gray-Man then I just don't get it, and I have nothing I can tell you about this volume. If you're not a fan, all I can do is keep warning you away. This is a volume full of non-start, ugly, sickening action. Whoever you are, you can't get around the fact that the characters take the entire volume just to go through a door.

 

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